Evidence of Learning 123-Midterm

Evidence of Learning 123-Midterm

Integrating Ideas with Others

During this course, I have learned about different terms that can help improve my writing when introducing another source or bringing in evidence to support a claim. These terms include pivotal words, signal phrases, and signal verbs. These terms have helped me better my writing instead of using the same three simple words when introducing a text. I also was introduced to Barclay’s formula paragraphs and TRIAC paragraphs to help integrate my ideas with those of others within a systematic paragraph. Before, I never would really use other sources well, even when they are given to me. Integrating the ideas of others while also providing evidence from other writing has really helped me to improve my argument and claim throughout my paper. I have learned how to be able to refer back to a text all throughout my paper, not just in the introduction, conclusion, and here and there in the body.

This comment shows me summarizing to help set up my claim. This summary is limited and primarily focused on setting up the project and/or central terms in the text. This also shows me starting to explain the relationship between evidence with my ideas.

 

This comment’s summary is very limited and in service of my project and writing.
This is an example of connecting between my ideas and text within and across paragraphs. It is also a generally solid explanation of relationships between my writing and the evidence.

 

This is an example of connecting between my ideas and text within and across paragraphs. It is also a generally solid explanation of relationships between my writing and the evidence.
Here I am attempting to challenge the ideas from a text.

Writing as a Recursive Process

During this course, I have learned many new ways to process my writing and go through the different steps to improve it as well. Before taking this course, I always would type up a paper the night before it was due, and pass it in as is without even looking it back over because I knew it was bad. Even when I had chances to revise, I simply just would not. I have learned that you obviously cannot do that, it is a multistep process. Adding paragraphs can add to the claim that is proposed, and can help solidify my argument. Reorganizing my paragraphs can help the flow of my paper, making it sound more professional as well. Before, when I would just pass in my papers as is, they were very difficult to follow. The paragraphs and overall structure of my paper would just seem like a chicken scratch note to use before writing the actual paper. Now, you can see a visual different before and after between my multiple drafts.

I never had a real process to anything, I would just go ahead and write it. But with this project, I had individual paragraphs in a single document and found areas where I could build upon certain thoughts. Then brought those into another document where I rearranged them into an order that may make sense. I then brought those into a draft document for myself where I made some comments on it for where I can edit things structurally. Once we had to have a draft, I then added everything into a document that could be shared and then added in an introduction and conclusion with some connecting sentences here and there. This next document was where I made most, if not all, of my edits and revision throughout many days. Finally, I made a document for my final draft.

This new paragraph (and evidence) helps to develop and strengthen ideas about one’s environment having a connection to literacy acquisition.
Reorganizing my paragraphs helped to strengthen my project. It went from randomness everywhere to having organized thoughts. Different topics of paragraphs were mixed all together, but organizing them has put them together so that the sequencing makes sense. This is an example of organizing paragraphs in a way to introduce key terms in the beginning so the reader is not confused later on.
In my introduction, I added more to the conversation by including another source, Alexander.

Many different reconstruction edits can be found in THIS document under the version history. Clicking on the different days can show you all the edits that were made throughout the revision process.

Active, Critical, and Informal Reading Response

Normally, I would never go out of my way to annotate unless it was absolutely necessary and asked of me. I never really enjoyed it and never saw that point in it, even though I got to a point where I would not remember anything from assigned readings. But now, I will go out of my way to annotate to try to understand readings, both in and outside of this course. I have learned that asking and answering questions about a text will really help me understand what the text is trying to convey to me as the reader. I do realize, though, that I am not always trying to challenge the ideas of a text. Mainly, I am asking questions and defining terms and sentences for me to understand the text better. I have plenty of annotations as well as good quality. Now that I have gotten to this stage, I feel as though going forward I can try to go beyond this by trying to challenge the text in front of me.

Though we did not have to annotate or anything while reading this narrative, I still took the initiative to go ahead and do it independently to understand the text better.
Though we did not have to annotate or anything while reading this narrative, I still took the initiative to go ahead and do it independently to understand the text better.

Critique Own and Others’ Work

The document that has my edits/ revisions as comments on how to improve my paper can be found:

HERE

You can look at the version history to see the different edits that were made at different times.

A snippet of my outline of what I have in my paper as well as what can be added.
Comments on Shamus Gorman’s rough draft. These comments were made because he had mainly just summarized the literacy narrative in his paragraph, there was not any form of argument involved. I had made suggestions on how he can connect the paragraph to his argument.
Comments on Shamus Gorman’s rough draft. This comment was made in regards to a paragraph that could involve a potential sponsor. I pose the question and give some suggestions on how he could go about bringing in sponsors to his paragraph.
Comments on Danielle Usko’s rough draft. In this comment, I give her a potential naysayer to her argument in this paragraph. She had correlated a female teacher with being almost better. But it was also said that the teacher was the student’s best friend’s mother, so I took that information to give Dani a potential naysayer to her argument.
Comments on Danielle Usko’s rough draft. This comment addresses how Dani had multiple paragraphs that introduced the characters, Dora and Raymond. These introductions felt repetitive so I suggested how she could only have one introduction and instead introduce the different aspects of them as she goes.